According to Frank's obituary printed in the Louisville (Ohio) Herald in 1917, he left Ohio for Kansas around 1883. It is believed that his daughter Della went with him at this time. The obituary of Della (Gaume) DeBacker states that her parents where innkeepers in St Marys, Kansas...

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The Gaumes Go West

It is not know for certain where Frank Gaume was living between the time of the death of his first wife in 1868 and up to the latter part of the 1870's, but it is known that in 1871 Frank Gaume married Justine Blanchard. In the military service records, for Frank Gaume there is a copy of the certified marriage record of "Frances Gaum and Justine Blanchard" and states that they were married July 28, 1871 in Holmes Co., Ohio. There is no death certificate for Frank Gaume in the records that I received, but there is one for his second wife, Justine (Blanchat) Gaume. She died April 7, 1936 in Kansas City, Missouri.

The document gives Justine's father's name as "Laurance O. Blanchat" - this is a name that shows up in a different context regarding a "criminal" incident that occurred in central Ohio during the Civil War - an incident that involved the indictment and arrest of Justine's father and similar charges being filed against Frank Gaume's uncle Louis.

In the spring of 1863, anti-draft protests erupted in the northern states. One such incident occurred in Holmes County, Ohio and involved some relatives of Frank Gaume who had recently relocated to Holmes County from Stark County. One of the ringleaders of the uprising was Laurence Blanchet (Blanchard), father of my gg-grandfather's second wife. The incident is a rather obscure one, but one that I found fascinating enough to want to research it. I was able to find some information from contemporary newspaper accounts, official military accounts and a detailed accounting and analysis of the event in a book published recently by a retired Ohio history teacher.

In March of 1863, the U.S. Congress enacted a draft (The Conscription Act), affecting male citizens aged 20 to 45, but also exempted those who paid $300 or provided a substitute.  This draft or enrollment as it was called was the first in American history and it did not sit well with some people in the Northern states. "The blood of a poor man is as precious as that of the wealthy," poor Northerners complained. The reaction against the draft was not immediate but as the end of spring rolled around Federal enrollment officers began appearing in towns and villages throughout the countryside preparing to enforce the act. In many places, these enrollment officers were not welcomed and were met with, in some cases, armed resistance. In June, enrollment officers in Indiana, Ohio, and Vermont ran into difficulties as they sought to record the names of all men eligible for the upcoming draft. Provost-Marshal Conrad Baker reported, "At Whitestown, Boone County, Eighth District, a mob of some twenty-five or thirty men surrounded the enrolling officer of that sub-district and caused the women of the town to assail him with eggs."

In that same week (June 16-20) in Holmes County, Ohio, Captain John Green of the US Army sent a request to Army headquarters Columbus for 300 soldiers to deal with "a large force of insurgents, estimated at 700 to 900, [which] are collected together" in Holmes County, Ohio.  Green continues, "I desire to use the troops in making arrests of parties who have obstructed the enforcement of the enrollment act."

What started with a couple men throwing rocks at an enrollment officer, culminated in shots being exchanged by men who had armed themselves to oppose the draft and by the soldiers who had been sent to arrest them. In the end, twenty-six men in Holmes County were indicted on various charges. Thirteen of those men were indicted for the more serious charge of treason. Who were these men and why had they taken up arms against the federal government?

One of the men arrested for treason was Laurent Blanchat, whose daughter, Justine, later married my gg-grandfather, Frank Gaume. Mr. Blanchat has been described in several accounts as the ringleader of the men involved in the incident and group had met and plans at his farm. Also arrested was Mr. Blanchat's neighbor, Louis Gaume, the uncle of Frank Gaume and another neighbor, Peter Drouhard, whose descendant Patrick J. Drouhard, an Ohio historian, wrote and published a history of the events of the Holmes County. Louis Gaume was never actually arrested and his case was nolled in 1866. Laurant Blanchat was arrested by the Army; while Peter Drouhard surrendered himself in Cleveland in 1864.  Those charged with treason saw their cases nolled in the end. However, Mr. Blanchat was found guilty of conspiring to resist the execution of the law and assaulting an officer. He was sentenced to six months hard labor in the Ohio penitentiary, but was pardoned by President Lincoln in September of 1864. In his analysis of the Holmes County Rebellion, Mr. Drouhard, categorizes the event as "not as an insurrection, nor rebellion against the US government, [but] was one of resistance to the [military] enrolment" and was only "loosely organized". Most of the men involved in the resistance were French or Swiss Catholic immigrants who had settled in Ohio in the 1830's and who had been in Holmes County since the 1850's. These were hard-scrabble, dirt-poor farmers who probably had come to see the war as a huge monstrous machine gobbling up their sons and destroying the economy under the leadership of tyrants.

Augustina Blanchard was also known as Josephine Blancherd. She was also known as Justine Blanchet. She was also known as Jessie M. Gaume. She was born in 1850 in Stark Co., Ohio. She appeared on the census of 1860 in the household of Lawrence Blanchard and Marguerite Duplain in Black Creek, Holmes Co., Ohio. She appeared on the census of 1870 in the household of Lawrence Blanchard and Marguerite Blanchat in Richland Twnshp, Holmes Co., Ohio. She married Francis Gaume, son of Jean Baptiste Francois Xavier Jeanin-Gaume and Marie Elise Faiver, on July 12, 1871 in Napoleon, Holmes Co., Ohio. She and Francis Gaume appeared on the census of 1880 in Shannon, Pottawatomie Co., Kansas. She appeared on the census of 1900 in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas. She appeared on the census of 1910 in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas. She appeared on the census of 1915 in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas. She appeared on the census of 1920 in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas.  Together they had 7 children.

According to Frank's obituary printed in the Louisville (Ohio) Herald in 1917, he left Ohio for Kansas around 1883. It is believed that his daughter Della went with him at this time. The obituary of Della (Gaume) DeBacker states that her parents where innkeepers in St Marys, Kansas. According to his military service pension request that was filed with US government around 1917 his residence was in Topeka, Kansas at the time of his of death and census records between 1900 and 1920 show that his wife, Justine, ran a boarding-house in Topeka.

After a considerable amount of time searching, I was finally able to locate the family of Frank Gaume living in Pottawatomie Co., Kansas in the U.S. Census of 1880. The record found on page 245C of the Shannon township, Pottawatomie Co., Kansas census presented a bit of a problem and it was not clear to me at first that I had actually found the family of my great-great grandfather. The names did not seem to match and ages did not seem correct when compared with the dates in affidavit filed in 1917 that I mention above. The census index lists the name as Frank L. Gaune. Below is a table showing the names listed in the 1880 census record compared with their known names as I know them.

Rel

Name

Age

Birth Place

Name As Known

HH

Francis L. Gaum

35

Ohio

Francis Gaume

W

Jessie M.

27

Ohio

Justine Blanchet

Son

Orin L.

8

Ohio

Lauren Gaume

Dau

Valentine

6

Ohio

Tiney Gaume

Dau

Catherine

4

Ohio

(Mary) Alice (Catherine) Gaume

Son

James L.

2

Ohio

Lewis Gaume

 Lauren Gaume was also known as Lawrence Gaume. He was also known as Orrin L. Gaume. He was born on January 24, 1873 in Ohio. He appeared on the census of 1880 in the household of Francis Gaume and Jessie M. Gaume in Shannon, Pottawatomie Co., Kansas. Nothing further is known of him or his descendents.

Eugene Gaume was born in April, 1875 in Ohio. He married Elizabeth Artzer on June 22, 1899 in Shawnee Co., Kansas. He was a cigarmaker in Topeka, Kansas. Both he and Elizabeth appear on all US census records between 1900 and 1930 in Topeka, Kansas. In each case, there are no children listed in the records.

Lewis Gaume was also known as James L. Gaume. He was born on April 1, 1876 in Ohio. According to Francis Gaume's Civil War Pension request (1915), Lewis' birthdate is April 1st, 1876; however the St. Louis Parish records (Louisville, Ohio) show that his sister, Alice, was baptised in 1876. The pension request shows that Alice's birthdate is Jan 24, 1877. Pratically all of the dates on the pension request have been proven to be wrong. 1880 census suggests that he was born 1878. He appeared on the census of 1880 in the household of Francis Gaume and Jessie M. Gaume in Shannon, Pottawatomie Co., Kansas. He appeared on the census of 1900 in the household of Augustina Blanchard in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas. He appeared on the census of 1910 in the household of Justine Gaume in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas. He died on June 16, 1916 in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas, at age 40.

Albert August Gaume was born in 1883 in Pottawatomie Co., Kansas. He was christened on January 22, 1883 in Immaculate Conception Church, St. Marys, Pottawatomie Co., Kansas. According to Francis Gaume's Civil War Pension request (1915): Albert Gaume was born in 1880, but parish records from Immaculate Conception Church shows that he was baptised in 1883.  He appeared on the census of 1900 in the household of Augustina Blanchard in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas. He appeared on the census of 1910 in the household of Justine Gaume in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas. He died in 1961 Elkhart, Indiana. His descendants live in Indiana.

Frank George Gaume was born in 1885 in Pottawatomie Co., Kansas. He was christened on February 12, 1885 in Immaculate Conception Church, St. Marys, Pottawatomie Co., Kansas. According to Francis Gaume's Civil War Pension request (1915), George Gaume was born in 1882, but parish records from Immaculate Conception Church shows that he was baptised in 1885. He appeared on the census of 1900 in the household of Augustina Blanchard in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas. He appeared on the census of 1910 in the household of Justine Gaume in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas. He married Sylvia ___. He appeared on the census of 1915 in the household of Augustina Blanchard in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas. He appeared on the census of 1920 in the household of Augustina Blanchard in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas. He died on October 17, 1933 in Topeka, Shawnee Co., Kansas.

Margaret Valentina Gaume was also known as Tiney. She was born on October 24, 1874 in Ohio. She appeared on the census of 1880 in the household of Francis Gaume and Jessie M. Gaume in Shannon, Pottawatomie Co., Kansas. She married Peter August Drouhard on November 30, 1898 in Glenmont, Ohio. She died on May 5, 1952 at age 77. The children of Valentina and Peter were:  Dorothy Drouhard, born on June 11, 1901; Cecelia Drouhard, born on October 16, 1904; Justine Drouhard, born on September 15, 1906; Margaret Drouhard, born on August 12, 1908; Rose Mary Drouhard, born on November 28, 1910; Thomas Drouhard, born on July 15, 1916; Theodore Drouhard, born on July 15, 1916; and Laura Elizabeth Drouhard, born on August 22, 1919.

Alice Gaume was also known as Catherine Gaume. She was also known as Mary Catherine Alice Gaume. She was born on January 24, 1876 in Ohio. She was baptized on January 26, 1876 in St. Louis Church, Louisville, Stark Co., Ohio. She appeared on the census of 1880 in the household of Francis Gaume and Jessie M. Gaume in Shannon, Pottawatomie Co., Kansas. She married Frank E. Wilcox on March 28, 1895. Their children were: Edmund Wilcox, born in April, 1896 in Kansas and Rosamond Wilcox, born in August, 1898 in Kansas. Rosamond died on July 27, 1923 in Kansas at age 24.

My gg-grandfather, seems to have had a knack for not showing up on census records. Before going off to war he does show up on the 1850 and 1860 US census records in the household of his parents. He is nowhere to be found in 1870 where his daughter, Della, does appears with Frank's mother Elise in Stark Co., Ohio. We know that he and Justine were married in Holmes Co., in 1871, but Frank does not appear in the records for that county in the previous year. He and Justine along with children do appear in the US Census of 1880 in Pottawatomie Co., Kansas. Of course, there are no census records available for the US census of 1890, but there are available Kansas state census records taken in the fifth year between the Federal accounting and Frank's name does not show on any Kansas state census records between 1885 and 1915. We do that he was in Colorado in 1890 because it was from there that he first petitioned the government for his Civil War pension.

According to the military service pension request that was filed with the US government in 1890, Frank Gaume lived for a while in Fort Morgan, Morgan Co., Colorado. The pension request reads as follows:

State of Colorado, County Of Morgan - On this 31st day of July, A.D. one thousand eight hundred and ninety personally appeared before me Frank Gaume within and for the Count and State aforesaid, aged 47 years a resident of the town of Fort Morgan, County of Morgan, State of Colorado, who being duly sworn according to the law declares that he is the identical Frank Gome who was enrolled sometime in August, 1862 in Company I of the 19th Regiment of Ohio Infantry in the War of the Rebellion, and served at least ninety days and was honorably discharged at Nashville, Tennessee sometime in May of 1863. That he is unable to earn a support by reason of rupture in right side and also lost hearing of left ear while in service caused by the discharge of a gun at Stone River near Murfreesborough, Tennessee.

A search of land patents filed by Gaume's in Colorado during the turn-of-the-century reveals the following:

Name

Date

Doc #

Serial #

County

Gaume, Eugene J

05/23/1910

01456

131877

Baca

Gaume, Frank E

12/31/1890

1246

Cocoaa 098124

Baca

Gaume, Frank E

08/09/1894

426

Cocoaa 098181

Baca

Gaume, Frank L

11/28/1910

1757

163330

Baca

Gaume, Louis

09/10/1886

3581

Cocoaa 046288

Morgan

Gaume, Louis

01/30/1885

4054

Cocoaa 046871

Logan

It is not known who these Gaume's are, but I have surmised the following: Eugene J. Gaume most likely Eugene Joseph Gaume (1876-1966), son of Louis Gaume. Frank E. Gaume could be Francis Xavier Eugene Gaume (1851-?), son of Louis Gaume. Frank L. Gaume is possibly my gg-grandfather. The land patent filed by Frank L. Gaume in 1910 was a re-issue of a patent originally filed in April of 1891. Louis Gaume may be Charles Louis Gaume (1853-1911), son of Louis Gaume and Josephine Faiver or it could his half brother, Louis Gaume (1871-?), son of Louis Gaume and Eugenie Cholley. It is likely that the Gaume's in Colorado were primarily occupied in prospecting and mining. Charles Louis Gaume and his son Eugene Joseph Gaume (1876-1966) prospected in Colorado and New Mexico.

Frank is listed as witness to a grand-son's baptism in St. Mary's, Kansas in 1892, but between then and 1912 he seems to have disappeared.

My gg-grandfather's  wife, Justine, and some of their son's appear together in the US Census of 1900, 1910, and 1920. She and their youngest son also appear on the Kansas state census of 1915. In each case the family appears in Topeka and in each case Frank is missing from the record. What is curious is that for the census record of 1900, Justine is listed as a widow. We know that Frank was not dead - he died in 1917, plus there is a record of him reapplying for his Civil pension in 1910, which he finally started receiving in 1912.  The 1910 census record does show Justine as being married. So, did Frank Gaume just disappear for twenty years and did his family actually think that he was dead in 1900? I wonder if he might have been in prison during that time. But if he had been convicted of a felony, wouldn't he have been denied his veteran's pension?

On October 9, 1917, Frank Gaume died in National Home, Kansas. He had been admitted to the "old soldier's home" in 1904 at age 61. His daughter Della (Gaume) DeBacker died October 03, 1923 in St. Marys, Kansas. She was 55 years "young" when she died.

Obituary of Frank Gaume

Louisville relative received the news of the death of Frank Gaume, which occurred at the soldier's home near St. Mary's, Kansas, last week. His age was seventy-three years. Mr. Gaume was born and raised near Louisville but moved to the west about thirty-five years ago. He is survived by seven children and the following sisters: Mrs. Stephen Saunier of St. Mary's, Kan., Mrs. Constance Saunier of Weldona, Colo., Mrs. Eliza Voisard and Mrs. L.S. Menegay of Louisville. Funeral services were held last Thursday and interment was made in the cemetery in connection with the home.

 

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