Links to KMZ files that can be viewed in Google Earth or Google Maps on-line
This section contains links to pages with maps showing locations referenced in Gathering Leaves in both Europe and the United States. Each page shows a snapshot of a KMZ file produced using Google Earth and then using Google Maps to generate a custom view of the map produced from the KMZ file. There are two links below each map that allow the KMZ to be viewed in either Google Maps (on-line) or downloaded and viewed in Google Earth. The maps displayed on the following pages show only portion of the information contained on the map. Use the map controls to zoom or pan around the map. The best option for viewing the maps is to download the KMZ to Google Earth by clicking the link "View in Google Earth".
DeBacker Places
Snapshot of map showing places related to the DeBacker family with links to view in either Google Maps or Google Earth.
Gaume Places
Snapshot of map showing places related to the Gaume family with links to view in either Google Maps or Google Earth.
Bannon Places
Snapshot of map showing places related to the Bannon family with links to view in either Google Maps or Google Earth.
Kollros Places
Snapshot of map showing places related to the Kollros family with links to view in either Google Maps or Google Earth.
Dobbs Places
Snapshot of map showing places related to the Dobbs family with links to view in either Google Maps or Google Earth.
Prothro Places
Snapshot of map showing places related to the Prothro family with links to view in either Google Maps or Google Earth.
King's Highway Tour (18th C.)
The routes that emmigrants would have followed from Delaware to South Carolina and on into Georgia were the two roads known as the King's Highway and the Fall Line Road. Starting in New Castle, Delaware they would have followed the King's Highway down to Annapolis, Maryland. From there they would have gone to Alexandria, Virginia and then on to Fredericksburg where the Fall Line Road began. This road traversed southern Virginia and the Carolinas eventually reaching the Savannah River at Augusta, Georgia. Cities they would have passed through on the way were Richmond and Petersburg in Virginia, Warrenton and Raleigh in North Carolina, and Cheraw and Camden in South Carolina. One thing to note is that in the late 18th century travelers from the northern colonies to the southern colonies were most likely to have gone by ship rather than overland (For example from Philadelphia to Charleston) as traveling by ship was much faster and safer than travelling by road. The same was true in the 1850's for travelers to California who were most likely have gone from the Atlantic coast to the Pacific coast via the isthmus of Panama rather than trekking across the prairies and deserts via wagon trains.
Fall Line Road Tour (18th C.)
The routes that emmigrants would have followed from Delaware to South Carolina and on into Georgia were the two roads known as the King's Highway and the Fall Line Road. Starting in New Castle, Delaware they would have followed the King's Highway down to Annapolis, Maryland. From there they would have gone to Alexandria, Virginia and then on to Fredericksburg where the Fall Line Road began. This road traversed southern Virginia and the Carolinas eventually reaching the Savannah River at Augusta, Georgia. Cities they would have passed through on the way were Richmond and Petersburg in Virginia, Warrenton and Raleigh in North Carolina, and Cheraw and Camden in South Carolina. One thing to note is that in the late 18th century travelers from the northern colonies to the southern colonies were most likely to have gone by ship rather than overland (For example from Philadelphia to Charleston) as traveling by ship was much faster and safer than travelling by road. The same was true in the 1850's for travelers to California who were most likely have gone from the Atlantic coast to the Pacific coast via the isthmus of Panama rather than trekking across the prairies and deserts via wagon trains.
Napoleonic Battles & Places (1792-1815)
Map showing various battles and important places associated with the Napoleonic era.
Erie Canal Tour (1830's)
Out of all the possible modes of transportation that my ancestors might have used during their migrations, I find that travel by way of canals to be fascinating and exotic. I have walked, ridden horses, road in wagons, traveled by train, and was once aboard a steamboat going down the mighty Mississippi, but I never been anywhere near a horse-drawn packet boat or the great canal system that once moved thousands of emigrants from the east to the west during the early part of the 19th century. From a number of first-hand (tour book) accounts of travel on the Erie canal, most written in the 1830's -The Great Water Highway through New York State, 1829 - published in a Philadelphia periodical by an unknown author[89],. Three Years In North America (1833), and Some Account of a Trip to the "Falls of Niagara" (1836), I have reconstructed what Francis Gaume's trek to Ohio from New York must have been like.
National Road Tour (1840's)
Joseph Kollros (my ggg-grandfather) and Magdalena Ringwald emigrated in 1844 from Baden, Germany. Their port of arrival is not known and their port of embarkation would probably have been Hamburg or Calais. In the 1840's emigration from the Duchy of Baden was made illegal and many fled political oppression in the German State by obtaining Alsatian visas from the French authorities across the Rhine River. It is therefore most likely that the Kollros family left Europe by way of the Port of Calais. Their destination was a small town in southeastern Indiana named Madison - approximately half along the Ohio River between Cincinnati, Ohio and Louisville, Kentucky. To get from the eastern seaboard to the town of Madison, Indiana on the Ohio River the Kollros family would have traveled possibly by rail from Baltimore to Cumberland. At Cumberland they would have traveled by wagon or stage along the National Pike through southwestern Pennsylvania to Wheeling, Virginia (now in West Virginia). From Wheeling they may have traveled by steamboat down the Ohio River to Madison or continued on the National Pike to Dayton, Ohio. From Dayton they would have traveled down the Miami-Ohio canal to Cincinnati and then by riverboat to Madison. The National Pike was a road created by an Act of Congress in 1806 that called for a road connecting the Atlantic coast to the Ohio River. The National Pike runs from Baltimore, through western Maryland, across the southwest corner of Pennsylvania and into West Virginia. In western Maryland and Pennsylvania, the road roughly followed Braddock's Road. In eastern Ohio, it followed Zane's Trace. Today the US Highway 40 roughly follows the remains of the National Pike.
Belfast to Cincinnati Tour (1850s)
Elenora Keenan, my ggg-grandmother, was born c. 1799 in Northern Ireland, and died c. 1860 in Louisville, Kentucky. She immigrated to the United States in 1849 from Ireland; arriving on November 01, 1849 at the Port of New Orleans from Liverpool. Before the invention of the steamboat, a trip from Louisville to New Orleans often required four months. In 1820, the trip was made by steamboat in 20 days. By 1838, the same trip was being made in six days. Elenora Bannon Campbell would have traveled from New Orleans to Louisville by way of steamboat up the Mississippi river to the Ohio River - the trip taking six to eight days.

In April 1848 trans-Atlantic crossings average time from Liverpool to New York (including a stop at Halifax) was down to 12 days 22 hours. In 1851, they averaged 11 days 12 hours eastbound, and 12 days 9 hours westbound.
Savannah to Dallas Tour (1870s)
Most likely route taken by George C. Spiegel and family when they traveled from Savannah, Georgia to Dallas, Texas. One thing is certain and that is based on the birth dates and birth places of his children that the family migrated from Savannah, Georgia to Dallas, Texas around 1870-71. In the early 1870s, Dallas was a major boom town. On July 16, 1872, the first passenger train, the Houston and Texas Central, arrived in Dallas. In 1873, the Texas and Pacific came. With the arrival of the trains, the population soared, from 3,000 in early 1872 to more than 7,000 in September of the same year. New businesses and buildings appeared daily.