Evan Prothro

M, #607, (c 1742 - c 1822)
Evan Prothro|b. c 1742\nd. c 1822|p607.htm|James Proth(e)ro|b. est 1722\nd. 1765|p498.htm||||John Pruddo|b. c 1700\nd. c 1761|p648.htm||||||||||

Relationship=3rd great-grandfather of James Monroe Dobbs Jr.
Last Edited=19 Oct 2009

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Evan Prothro was born about 1742 in Cheraws (Darlington) District, South Carolina.2 He was the son of James Proth(e)ro.1 He married Elizabeth Morgan.3 He died about 1822 in Elbert County, Georgia.

Both Evan and his brother John served as privates in Colonel Powell's battalion of the South Carolina militia's Cherokee expedition of 1759.4 According to the Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution, Evan Prothero was a soldier of the American Revolution. He served in the militia during 1781 and was a hog driver during 1782. In those days, long before canning and refrigeration, hog drivers had the task of keeping the army provisioned with livestock. It is therefore possible to imagine that he saw action at Camden, Guilford, or possibly Yorktown along with other South Carolina militiamen. He appears in an account audited (file no. 6148) of claims growing out of the American revolution.5 He appears on a plat for 640 acres on Boggy swamp in 1786 in Cheraws District, South Carolina.6 He appears a plat for 640 acres on Jefferies Creek in 1787 in Cheraws District, South Carolina.7 Following the Revolutionary War, a great many of the veterans of that war migrated into the backcountry of South Carolina and the upcountry of Georgia along the Savannah River. Headright grants were given to patriots in return for their service during the war. Under the headright system a veteran was granted 50 acres or more free of charge in return for service. Between 1790 and 1800, the population of Georgia jumped 97%. He appears on a plat for 163 acres on Jacks Bay in 1791 in Cheraws District, South Carolina.8 He appears on a plat for 400 acres on Jacks Bay in 1793 in Cheraws District, South Carolina.9 He appears on a plat for 310 acres on Jeffries Creek in 1793 in Cheraws District, South Carolina.10 He purchased 500 acres on Lynches Creek in 1795 in Cheraws District, South Carolina.11 It was in Elbert county, Georgia and Aiken county, South Carolina, along the Savannah River, that the Prothro's settled after the Revolutionary War. Elbert County was settled in the 1780's "by pioneers who came from Virginia and the Carolinas with gun and axe to open up the Cherokee lands. The town [of Elberton] was named for Samuel Elbert, the revolutionary who took Fort Oglethorpe and later became governor of Georgia. When Elbert county was created in 1790 [from a portion of Wilkes county], Elberton became the county seat". He appears on a plat for 985 acres on Jeffries Creek and Middle Swamp in 1812 in Cheraws District, South Carolina.12 He mentioned in the will of one William Zimmerman in 1816 in Darlington District, South Carolina.13 In Feburary 1817, James and Anna Prothro sold to Nathaniel Prothro 540 acres on the banks of the north fork of Cedar creek in Elbert County, Georgia. This land was adjacent to land owned by the Dobbs family. The deed was witnessed by Evan Prothro and his wife Elizabeth. (see Nathaniel Prothro).14 He left a will in December, 1822 in Elbert County, Georgia. Named as heirs were James Prothro, William Prothro, Patsy Myers, Daniel Myers, Susanna Myers, William Myers and Nathaniel Prothro.15 One son of James Prothero, Evan Prothero (my 5th great-grandfather), is said to have been born in Radnor, Pennsylvania around 1742. I do not know if this is just a guess as to the location of his birth, but if the family had settled in the Carolinas long before the 1740's they may very well have maintained ties with the north to the extent that they spent some of their time in Pennsylvania and some in South Carolina.
According to the Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution (A.A.6148; Y592), Evan Prothero was a soldier of the American Revolution; he served in the militia during 1781 and was a hog driver during 1782. It is therefore possible to imagine that he saw action at Camden, Guilford, or possibly Yorktown along with other South Carolina militia-men.
He appears in the U.S. Census of 1790 in the Cheraw District, S.C.
Following the Revolutionary war a great many of the veterans of that war migrated into the backcountry of South Carolina and the upcountry of Georgia along the Savannah River. Headright grants were given to patriots in return for their service during the war. Under the headright system a veteran was granted 50 acres or more free of charge in return for service. Between 1790 and 1800 the population of Georgia jumped 97%.
It was in Elbert county, Georgia that the Prothero's settled. Elbert county was settled in the 1780's "by pioneers who came from Virginia and the Carolinas with gun and axe to open up the Cherokee lands. The town [of Elberton] was named for Samuel Elbert, the revolutionary who took Fort Oglethorpe and later became governor of Georgia. When Elbert county was created in 1790 [from a portion of Wilkes county], Elberton became the county seat" (WPA Writer's Project, Georgia, Univ. Of Georgia, Athens [1940], pg 349).
The story from this point on could begin and end simply: In 1792, Eli Whitney invented the Cotton Gin and cotton became king...
Eli Whitney, a graduate of Yale, had come to Georgia as a tutor. In 1793 he filed a patent for his invention, the Cotton Gin (engine), that separated the seeds from lint of the variety of cotton that grew well in the southern states of North America, but removing the seeds from the cotton lint was time-consuming and could be done only by hand. Prior to Mister Whitney's invention of annual cotton exports were around 138,000 lbs. In 1794 cotton exports jumped to 1.6 million lbs. By 1800 cotton production had climbed to 35 million lbs., of which 17.8 million lbs. were exported (South Carolina: A Bicentennial History, pg. 150).
The demand from Europe and the northern states for cotton made the Protheros and their neighbors very prosperous and wealthy.
Evan Prothro, the great-grandson of Evan Protheroe, died in 1822 in Elbert county, Georgia. His last will and testament is as follows:
Will of Evan Prothro, December 1822
In the name of God, amen. I, Evan Prothro, Sr., do make and publish this my last will and testament in manner and form following, that is to say, after all my just and lawful debts and funeral charges are paid. 1st, I give and bequeath unto my well beloved second eldest son James Prothro his Heirs and c. forever one bond due from William Zimmerman, for the sum of six hundred and upward of forty dollars.
2nd, I give and bequeath unto my well beloved third eldest son William Prothro, to him and his heirs forever, one bond due from William Zimmerman for the sum of six hundred and upward of forty dollars.
3rd, I give and bequeath unto the surviving heirs of my well beloved daughter Caty Hughes, deceased, four hundred and eighty six dollars, monies due from the estate of James Hughes, deceased, to be divided among her, my daughter's, surviving heirs each share and share alike, with the interest due on the said bequeathed sum of four hundred and eighty six dollars.
4th, I give and bequeath unto my four grand children, the surviving heirs of my well beloved daughter Rachael Myers, deceased, to wit, Patsy, Daniel, Suzanna, William Myers, the sum of one hundred and eighty six dollars with the interest on the said sum of monies due me from Daniel Myers to be equally divided among them each share and share alike.
5th, I give and bequeath unto my well beloved oldest son Nathaniel Prothro and his heirs forever seven Negroes to wit: Mariah, a wench, Tona a wench, Harper, a man, Susannah a wench, Daniel, a boy, Sarah a girl and Miner a boy, together with all my household furniture, my horses, best bridle and saddle and all my plantation working tools, bees, debts, bonds, notes of hand and every other article of my property not otherwise already bequeathed (except my Negro man Sipio) to him my said son Nathaniel Prothro his heirs &c forever them and their increase.
6th, lastly I give and bequeath unto my Negro man Sipio his entire freedom and likewise if him, the said Negro man Sipio should become through old age or affliction so infirm as not to be able to labor I do by this will and testament enjoin my said son Nathaniel to keep the said Negro Sipio & maintain him, the said Negro Sipio out of his share of dues in my bequest.
This my last will and testament, and in witness and in testimony of the same, I revoke and make null and void all other will or wills by me heretofore or hereafter made, ordaining and publishing this my last will and testament, appointing my beloved son Nathaniel and Evan Prothro my sole executors of this my last will and testament and in acknowledgement of the same I have hereto set my hand and affixed my seal this 25th day of December 1817.
Evan Prothro (seal)
Signed and acknowledged in presence of
Daniel Dobbs
John Dobbs
Moses Haynes, sen.
Recorded the 12th Jany. 1822
Jeb Weston, C.C.C.
This will certified by Clark Edwards, Ordinary, Elberton, GA, May 28th, 1823

I do not know the name of Evan Prothro's wife. She appears to have died before 1822. Evan Prothro had at least five children that survived into adulthood: Nathaniel, Catherine, Rachel, James, and William, all of whom were born probably born in Prince George Parish, South Carolina before the revolutionary war.
In his will Evan appointed his eldest son Nathaniel and his grand-son Evan as sole executors of the will. It appears that Nathaniel died the following year. It is not difficult to imagine that father and son died during the yellow fever epidemic of 1820-1823 which ironically originated in Pennsylvania and swept southward (Al Dawson, Berea, Ohio - MA, History, UNC-Chapel Hill, 1973). He appears in a number of records found in the South Carolina Archives (see exhibit).
For more information see article The Prothro Family.
Charts
My Ancestors
Ancestors of James Monroe Dobbs, Jr.
Descendants of John Pruddo
Dobbs Timeline

Children of Evan Prothro and Elizabeth Morgan

Citations

  1. [S356] Mabel L. Webber (comp.), "Abstracts Of Records Of The Proceedings In The Court Of Ordinary, 1764-1771," in The South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine (VOLUME XXI, No. i), Mabel L. Webber, editor. (Charleston, South Carolina: South Carolina Historical Society, January, 1920), page 128., "Citation to Evan Prothro of Prince George's parish planter to adminr. on estate of James Prothro of sd. parish planter, his father 5 June, 1765". Hereinafter cited as "Abstracts Of Records Of The Proceedings In The Court Of Ordinary."
  2. [S353] "More Comments", e-mail message from George Prothro Coulter to Mike DeBacker, 3 Mar 2008. Hereinafter cited as "More Comments."
  3. [S352] "Pedigree Charts", e-mail message from George Prothro Coulter to Mike DeBacker, 28 Apr 2008, Evan's wife was Elizabeth (probably Morgan), who died some time in the year 1817, in Georgia.. Hereinafter cited as "Pedigree Charts."
  4. [S414] Neil O. Myers, Myers and Neighbors of Jefferies Creek, SC (Aiken, South Carolina: Neil O. Myers, 2007), page 79 - cites South Carolina Colonial Soldiers and Patriots by Leonardo Andrea p. 27.
  5. [S364] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, online http://scdah.sc.gov/, Series:S108092; Reel:0121; Frame:00195; ignore:000; Date:1776 C. or later. [http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/…
  6. [S364] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, online http://scdah.sc.gov/, Series:S213212; Volume:0001; Page:00155; Item:020; Date:8/14/1786 [http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/…].
  7. [S364] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, online http://scdah.sc.gov/, Series:S213190; Volume:0014; Page:00205; Item:002; Date:1/6/1787 [http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/…].
  8. [S364] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, online http://scdah.sc.gov/, Series:S213190; Volume:0027; Page:00503; Item:001; Date: 12/14/1791.
  9. [S364] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, online http://scdah.sc.gov/, Series:S213190; Volume:0031; Page:00554; Item:002; Date:9/7/1793 . [http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/…
  10. [S364] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, online http://scdah.sc.gov/, Series:S213190; Volume:0033; Page:00268; Item:001; Date:9/7/1793 [http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/…].
  11. [S364] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, online http://scdah.sc.gov/, Series:S213190; Volume:0032; Page:00423; Item:003; Date:6/24/1795 [http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/…].
  12. [S364] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, online http://scdah.sc.gov/, Series:S213192; Volume:0043; Page:00212; Item:001; Date:8/24/1812 [http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/…].
  13. [S364] South Carolina Department of Archives and History, online http://scdah.sc.gov/, Series:S108093; Reel:0007; Frame:00577; Item:000; Date:9/2/1816. Also mentioned are Daniel (Slave); Dargan, Timothy; Harry (Slave); Prothro, Evan; Prothro, James; Prothro, William; Sam (Slave); Zimmerman, Daniel; Zimmerman, Eliza; Zimmerman, James; Prothro, William; Sam (Slave); Zimmerman, Daniel; Zimmerman, Eliza; Zimmerman, James; Zimmerman, John; Zimmerman, Melvina; Zimmerman, Sarah; Zimmerman, William. [http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/…
  14. [S414] Neil O. Myers, Myers and Neighbors of Jefferies Creek, SC (Aiken, South Carolina: Neil O. Myers, 2007), page 82 - cites: Elbert County Deed Book T pg 17.
  15. [S414] Neil O. Myers, Myers and Neighbors of Jefferies Creek, SC (Aiken, South Carolina: Neil O. Myers, 2007), page 40 - Cites: Elbert County Will Book L, pgs 456-457.
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